Controversies” exhibit at MHHM

The exhibit “Controversies” presents challenging subject matter that inspires people to consider, or reconsider, the ways in which they think about important and frequently debated issues: medical experimentation, immigration, and the right to die. This spring Macculloch Hall Historical Museum (MHHM) is presenting a speaker series in conjunction with the exhibit, taking place on the first Sunday of each month through June. The exhibit explores local history events which had national significance: the Antoine LeBlanc murder trial and public execution; the immigration issues of the late nineteenth century as depicted by political cartoonist Thomas Nast, a Morristown resident, and the 1976 Karen Ann Quinlan “right to die” case.

On Sunday May 4th Virginia Dyer Vogt continues the “Controversies” exhibit speaker series with a presentation, “Nineteenth-Century Morristown’s Most Heinous Crime”. Ten thousand watched Antoine LeBlanc’s gruesome punishment, but was justice served? In her book “Death By Moonlight”, Ms. Vogt used trial records and other historical documents to take a new look at the notorious capital punishment case featured in the “Controversies” exhibit— the1833 triple murder of Judge and Mrs. Samuel Sayre and their young slave Phebe.  LeBlanc was hanged for the crime, but evidence suggests that dark historical undercurrents, public outrage, and judicial pressure combined to assure a grisly outcome for the accused, both before and after his death. Ms. Vogt will be available to sign and sell books after the presentation.

Following the presentation visitors can view the exhibit, including Le Blanc’s death mask, and consider the issues raised.  Where most exhibits typically provide detailed information about the objects on view, “Controversies” offers limited information about the objects, essentially forcing personal thought, and inspiring discussion, about the areas represented.  Information drawn from primary sources within the exhibit include news articles, contemporary commentary, and images.  “Controversies” is on view during Museum touring hours through June 2014. Please note the subject matter may not be suitable for all audiences. For more information about the speakers in the “Controversies” series who present on the first Sunday of each month through June, visit maccullochhall.org. Information on a second series of programs celebrating New Jersey’s 350th Anniversary and taking place on the second Sunday of each month through June, is also available on the website.

Tickets for Sunday programs go on sale from 1pm on the day of the program, no advance sales, and remain on sale until the presentation begins at 4:30pm.

KHollywood@maccullochhall.org /www.maccullochhall.org

The current exhibition in the main gallery “Controversies” explores topics that helped shaped our world through local history events which had national significance: medical experimentation, immigration, and the right to die. A speaker series in conjunction with the exhibit takes place on the first Sunday of the month, March – June.  On Sunday May 4th, at 4:30pm, Virginia Dyer Vogt continues the “Controversies” exhibit speaker series with a presentation, “Nineteenth-Century Morristown’s Most Heinous Crime”. Ten thousand watched Antoine LeBlanc’s gruesome punishment, but was justice served? In her book “Death By Moonlight”, Ms. Vogt used trial records and other historical documents to take a new look at the notorious capital punishment case featured in the “Controversies” exhibit— the1833 triple murder of Judge and Mrs. Samuel Sayre and their young slave Phebe. Tickets are on sale on the day, from 1pm – 4:30pm, no advance sales.  For more information about tickets and other details visit maccullochhall.org, find us on Facebook or call the Museum weekdays at(973) 538-2404 ext. 10.Macculloch Hall Historical Museum, 45 Macculloch Avenue, Morristown, NJ 07960

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