My Paper Online Online Local Community News for New Jersey 2018-06-21T13:42:44Z https://www.mypaperonline.com/feed/atom new_view_media <![CDATA[Tickets On Sale For Three Day Balloon Festival]]> https://www.mypaperonline.com/?p=42823 2018-06-21T13:42:44Z 2018-06-21T13:42:44Z Memorial Day Weekend launches the beginning of summer … and it launches balloons, too.
Tickets for the 36 th annual QuickChek New Jersey Festival of Ballooning in Association with PNC Bank,
the largest summertime hot air balloon and music festival in North America, are on sale at all 156
QuickChek fresh convenience market store locations throughout New Jersey, the Hudson Valley and Long
Island.

Pictured, from left, QuickChek CEO Dean Durling, Store Leader Kathy Rhinesmith in balloon basket, Butler Mayor Robert Alviene and members of the Butler/Bloomingdale Youth Club celebrate

The three-day festival has been named the “#1 Thing to Do in New Jersey” by “New Jersey
Monthly”magazine and the premier family entertainment attraction in the state by the USATODAY
Network.
This year’s festival features the awe-inspiring spectacle of twice a day mass ascensions of 100 hot air
balloons from around the world taking flight over the scenic Hunterdon County countryside and a hugely
popular live concert series featuring pop star Andy Grammer.
The festival takes off July 27-28-29 from Solberg Airport in Readington.
New special shaped hot air balloons include the 120-foot-tall QuickChek saxophone which recognizes the
festival’s position as the largest hot air balloon and music festival; an 85-foot-tall Queen’s Guard in honor
of the Royal Wedding; a 115-foot-tall puppy; a 75-foot-tall yellow bird and 75-foot-tall Rocket the Flying
Squirrel cartoon character balloons.
Returning favorites include the PNC American Flag, the world’s largest free-flying American flag; the 110-
foot-tall Unique Photo Panda; the 105-foot-tall Bimbo white bear; and an 80-foot-tall Pepsi football.
And making his big comeback, the 105-foot-tall Elvis special shaped balloon.
The Progressive Stage is home to this year’s live concert series. PNC Bank presents Andy Grammer in
association with Magic 98.3 FM on Friday, July 27. The New Jersey Lottery presents Lifehouse in
association with the Festival’s nighttime hot air balloon glow on Saturday, July 28. Creedence Clearwater
Revisited performs Sunday, July 29.
Best-selling children’s recording artist Laurier Berkner of Princeton opens the concerts on Friday
afternoon, July 27, presented by Hackensack Meridian Health.
Festival admission includes access to the daily mass hot air balloon ascensions; lawn seating for concerts;
a fireworks display; a nighttime hot air balloon glow; death-defying stunts by world record human
cannonball David “The Bullet” Smith; age-appropriate children’s entertainment and activities; exciting
interactive exhibits and hundreds of crafters and food vendors.

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new_view_media <![CDATA[Decks And Pools Splash Summer With Fun]]> https://www.mypaperonline.com/?p=42820 2018-06-21T13:38:13Z 2018-06-21T13:38:13Z By Ricki Demarest
It’s always fun to enjoy family and friends during special get togethers
at home, but, in the summertime, enjoying the sun by the side of the
pool or grilling on the deck make those times even better.
Now is the time for homeowners to make sure those festive outdoor
spaces are ready for fun times to carry on before the leaves begin to
fall.
Approximately 50 million American homes have outdoor decks,
according to the North American Deck and Railing Association. It’s
estimated that about half of them have safety issues. Before the power
washer and the planters come out, it’s vital to check for signs of wear
such as cracks in decking material, weakened joists, rotted wood and
loose railings. Insect invasions from carpenter ants, termites and bees
can wreak havoc as well. Older decks may not be up to present
construction codes either. Building codes are updated about every
three years, and it’s a good idea to check whether the deck’s
guardrails, handrails, lighting, stairs, and landings meet current
safety standards. Mold, mildew, and even wooden slat replacement
can usually be handled by a homeowner or contractor.
If the hurdles of maintenance and replacement have been cleared, its
time to get down to the nitty gritty of deck cleaning.
Nick O’Donnell, the manager at Homecraft Rental Center in
Ledgewood, said customers can usually count on using a pressure
washer to initiate deck cleanup.
“People have to pressure wash first, then let it dry for a couple days,”
he said. “Then they have to sand the surface and stain it right away,” to
create a weather proof and esthetically pleasing surface. “You have a

90 per cent chance of sanding. You have to do that before you stain – it
eliminates peeling.”
Although O’Donnell and his staff make sure to explain how the
equipment works, he said most people don’t pay attention. It doesn’t
matter. They are always welcome to call back with questions. The
Consumer Reports website offers a thorough yet concise explanation of
how to power wash a deck.
https://www.consumerreports.org/pressure-washers/how-to-clean-a-
deck-with-a-pressure-wash/
Deck cleaning comes with eco-friendly options. The website
www.house-painintg-info.com lists mixtures that include white vinegar
and mild dish soap (good for degreasing and mildew), baking soda,
hydrogen peroxide and even OxiClean. All can be diluted with water
and used on the deck surface.
The cleaning, scrubbing and maintenance certainly doesn’t stop with
the deck. Swimming pools, large and small, demand preparation and
routine maintenance to keep them sparkling.
Jim Pagonis, the owner of American Pools in Kenvil said that this year’s
longer winter meant that his clients’ in ground pools were “greener”
when he got them open. “Longer winters breed algae in pools,” he said.
The more quickly the pool is chemically treated, and the filtration
system established, the better it will be for swimming throughout the
season.
The do-it-yourself shopping list for pool maintenance should include
chemicals such as pool shock, chlorine and a chlorine stabilizer. A
telescopic pole with a skimmer head, vacuum head, vacuum hose and
pool brush should become best friends with the pool surface over the
next few months. An entire test kit or new test strips are essential.

“Test the water with a good test kit every two to three days,” Pagonis
emphasized.
He and other pool service professionals are happy to take on the
daunting task of creating a safe and beautiful swimming environment.
A recent release from the Denville office of the Metro Chapter of the
Northeast Spa and Pool Association stated
“pool pumps, motors, filters, chlorinators, feeders, salt chlorine
generators, heaters, heat pumps, blowers, controls, and more are
critical for pool maintenance and are a lot to keep up with for someone
not professionally trained. For safety, a pool professional will review all
aspects of your pool to make sure it is operating safely and doesn’t
pose any safety risks. This includes a review of safety barriers (fencing
etc.), drain covers and in pool lighting.”
Meanwhile, crews from Champs Pool Service in Budd Lake are also
scrambling to ready people’s swimming holes. Everett Demouth, the
store manager, said he noticed that above ground pool covers have
been filling with water. “During the fall and spring people aren’t
keeping water off covers, and that can collapse the pool,” he noted.
Throughout the swimming season both stores follow up with clients,
testing pools and solving any problems that may arise. Demouth said
opening an above ground pool costs about $150, while an in ground
runs about $350 – $500. Broken equipment, pool cracks and other
issues increase the price.
Finally, safety is paramount to enjoying decks and pools to the fullest.
In addition to previously mentioned construction and pool chemistry,
safety precautions include appropriate child supervision around pools
and grills, correct gates, and having life-saving equipment close by.
Professional associations such as NESPA (www.nespapool.org) as well

as municipal officials can help homeowners who have questions about
safety and building code compliance.
With the right planning and execution, the pool and deck can be the go
to areas for the family and maybe even the neighborhood to
cannonball into summer fun.

]]>
0
new_view_media <![CDATA[Mt. Olive Woman Directs Dress For Success With More Partnerships And Fundraisers]]> https://www.mypaperonline.com/?p=42816 2018-06-21T13:35:42Z 2018-06-21T13:35:42Z By Cheryl Conway
With more partnerships and fundraisers, the new director of Dress For Success
Northern N.J. hopes to grow the non-profit to support a greater number of women
seeking jobs and confidence to succeed in the workforce.
Kimberly Iozzi, 45, of Budd Lake began on April 30 in her new role as executive
director of Dress For Success Northern N.J. covering 10 counties throughout the
state. As the former executive director of the Newton Housing Authority for 15
years, Iozzi brings years of experience in government and nonprofit management,
dedicating her entire career to empowering low and moderate-income families
achieve economic self-sufficiency, personal development and growth.
When she saw the position open for Dress For Success advertised through the
Center For Nonprofits, Iozzi says she jumped at the opportunity.
“I was looking for a change,” she says, as she describes her passion for helping
women succeed in the workforce.
Dress for Success Northern NJ- 10 Counties, servesMorris, Sussex, Warren, Hunterdon,
Bergen, Essex, Middlesex, Somerset, Union and Passaic counties. While it is an affiliate of the
Dress for Success Worldwide organization, it is an independent 501©3, responsible for its own
fundraising and operations. It relies solely on corporate, foundation and individual contributions
to serve its clients at no cost to them.
The mission of the organization is to empower women to achieve economic independence by
providing a network of support, professional attire and development tools to help women thrive
in work and in life.
“The goal is to provide all developmental tools, get the interview and do well and to build their
confidence,” says Iozzi.
All of the programs are offered at no cost to participants. The organization served more than
1,500 women last year, ages 18 to 64, and is well on its way to double that amount this year.
“I really want to do more locally to generate support for the mission through both
educational events, fundraising, and more,” she says.
As the new executive director, Iozzi oversees the day-to-day operations of the
organization.
“We run nine programs,” she says, and have 600 volunteers with three paid staff
members that manage the programs.
One of the programs is a Career Center in which women get assistance with their
resumes, interview and online job searches.
Another program, Steps For Success offers a 10-week job ready boot camp for
unemployed women to break down barriers and provide an extra push to assist a
woman in getting a job.
“The women come from all different backgrounds,” says Iozzi, not just those who
are disadvantaged. Some are stay-at-home moms trying to get back into the
workforce, others are first time clients trying to enter the workforce.
Other programs include mentoring, technology skills, time management and
budgeting and Foundation For Success in which women are provided tips on how to
keep their employment.

A Professional Women’s Group is also offered to provide monthly networking
meetings featuring speakers to discuss professional issues, personal growth,
budgeting and balancing.
The Mobile is another program in which a van visits agencies by appointment and
operates as a boutique with volunteer stylists on board to play dress up with suits
and help women build confidence.
“Its largest suiting was for 70 people,” notes Iozzi. Women are given a referral
sheet, are sized and pick their outfits from colors of suits and shoe styles from
heels to flats, and also receive a one hour training session.
“It’s amazing to see the transformation that happens,” says Iozzi. The Mobile
“brings suits to them, does training,” covering interview tips, how to engage, how
to shake hands, what questions to ask.
With the main boutique at the Madison Community House in Madison, Iozzi hopes
to expand to include satellite offices in each of the 10 counties “so people can
donate, get clothing and training,” closer to where they live.
Bridge to Success is another program in which clients can engage in a bimonthly
job search after they go through steps of training, explains Iozzi.
“This bridge helps them with their one on one to give them the tools,” she says, to
succeed.
Since women are served for free, Iozzi stresses it is “so important to have grants
and donations.”
While the majority of the women are referred to Dress For Success by partnering
agencies, the organization will connect with all women who need assistance. Some
partners include the Women’s Center at the County College of Morris in Randolph,
and Jersey Battered Women’s Service.
“We need more referral agencies to refer clients to us,” says Iozzi, “partnerships from every level. We
are looking for community ambassadors” to hold suit drives for suits, shoes, handbags and jewelry,
“whatever makes up a professional. Or host a fundraiser or empower hours to donate a percentage to
Dress For Success.
“We need to catch up with our donations so we can grow moving forward,” says Iozzi. With “only four of
us on staff we definitely need support.”
Some ways to get involved include: Be a referral agency to enroll clients in suiting and training
programs; donate professional attire; coordinate a suit, accessory, toiletry or shoe drive;
volunteer to provide free one-on-one job coaching/mentoring; be a personal shopper for the
mobile suiting unit; be a personal stylist, helping clients select appropriate attire for a
professional look; provide a training on personal and/or professional development topics; host a
lunch-n-learn to learn about the programs; help coordinate a &quot;Walk today so we can run
tomorrow&quot; 5K; host fundraisers or donate proceeds from events; be a speaker; make a one-time
or recurring donation.
In its 20 th year, Iozzi says “I know we are doing something right.” Clients seek jobs in all areas from
doctors, accountants, customer service, corporations and even Emmy writers.
“It’s crazy the diversity we have,” says Iozzi, who was selected recently to serve as vice president for the
Morris County Human Relations Commission.
“While most people immediately think of us as &#39;the suits,” it is so much more than that. Our
organization is all about building confidence, not just in appearance, but through the
development of key competencies that are essential to excel in the workplace.
“You can look good but you may not have the skill set,” she says. “We offer many programs and
are always looking to do more.”

Dress For Success recently held its largest fundraiser with its gala in May at the Park Savoy in
Florham Park. She plans to host the organization’s first fashion show in the spring of 2019. On
October 19 she is looking for a venue to recognize the first suiting ever held for a woman
through Dress For Success, and will also plan a golf outing and other smaller events.
In her role for just two months so far, Iozzi says “I love it. Every day is just a fulfillment; you are
making a difference in someone’s life. We are changing lives. She’s now able to support her
family. We are giving women confidence, if they lost it along the way. Everybody has a story.
We are building them up, giving them the tools they need to be successful.
“You can’t buy that satisfaction or making a true difference in someone’s life. I love my job. I’m
at a point to make a real difference and this is definitely it.”
Dress For Success Northern N.J. is one of three branches in N.J. and the Madison office is one
of 154 offices in 30 countries worldwide.
“We are here and we need help,” she concludes. “If people have ideas for fundraisers or
partnerships, I’m open. I tend to think outside the box.”
Iozzi can be reached at her email address:kim@dfsnorthernnj.org or visit
northernnj.dressforsuccess.org.

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new_view_media <![CDATA[Garage Offers Complete Car Care In Clean Environment]]> https://www.mypaperonline.com/?p=42813 2018-06-21T13:33:32Z 2018-06-21T13:33:32Z MuscleCar Garage offers year round and seasonal storage as well as full mechanical services on
premises. It offers everything from simple tune-ups &amp; maintenance, to engine, transmission,
brake and suspension upgrades all in a clean and grease-free environment! Call Joel or Steve at:
(973) 758-8944 with any service questions or requests. Its guarantees that a client’s precious
classic will be returned cleaner than when it arrived! Local pick-up &amp; delivery of a vehicle is
available. Check out www.musclegarage.com.

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new_view_media <![CDATA[Decks And Pools Splash Summer With Fun]]> https://www.mypaperonline.com/?p=42808 2018-06-21T13:12:58Z 2018-06-21T13:12:58Z By Ricki Demarest
It’s always fun to enjoy family and friends during special get togethers
at home, but, in the summertime, enjoying the sun by the side of the
pool or grilling on the deck make those times even better.
Now is the time for homeowners to make sure those festive outdoor
spaces are ready for fun times to carry on before the leaves begin to
fall.
Approximately 50 million American homes have outdoor decks,
according to the North American Deck and Railing Association. It’s
estimated that about half of them have safety issues. Before the power
washer and the planters come out, it’s vital to check for signs of wear
such as cracks in decking material, weakened joists, rotted wood and
loose railings. Insect invasions from carpenter ants, termites and bees
can wreak havoc as well. Older decks may not be up to present
construction codes either. Building codes are updated about every
three years, and it’s a good idea to check whether the deck’s
guardrails, handrails, lighting, stairs, and landings meet current
safety standards. Mold, mildew, and even wooden slat replacement
can usually be handled by a homeowner or contractor.
If the hurdles of maintenance and replacement have been cleared, its
time to get down to the nitty gritty of deck cleaning.
Nick O’Donnell, the manager at Homecraft Rental Center in
Ledgewood, said customers can usually count on using a pressure
washer to initiate deck cleanup.
“People have to pressure wash first, then let it dry for a couple days,”
he said. “Then they have to sand the surface and stain it right away,” to
create a weather proof and esthetically pleasing surface. “You have a

90 per cent chance of sanding. You have to do that before you stain – it
eliminates peeling.”
Although O’Donnell and his staff make sure to explain how the
equipment works, he said most people don’t pay attention. It doesn’t
matter. They are always welcome to call back with questions. The
Consumer Reports website offers a thorough yet concise explanation of
how to power wash a deck.
https://www.consumerreports.org/pressure-washers/how-to-clean-a-
deck-with-a-pressure-wash/
Deck cleaning comes with eco-friendly options. The website
www.house-painintg-info.com lists mixtures that include white vinegar
and mild dish soap (good for degreasing and mildew), baking soda,
hydrogen peroxide and even OxiClean. All can be diluted with water
and used on the deck surface.
The cleaning, scrubbing and maintenance certainly doesn’t stop with
the deck. Swimming pools, large and small, demand preparation and
routine maintenance to keep them sparkling.
Jim Pagonis, the owner of American Pools in Kenvil said that this year’s
longer winter meant that his clients’ in ground pools were “greener”
when he got them open. “Longer winters breed algae in pools,” he said.
The more quickly the pool is chemically treated, and the filtration
system established, the better it will be for swimming throughout the
season.
The do-it-yourself shopping list for pool maintenance should include
chemicals such as pool shock, chlorine and a chlorine stabilizer. A
telescopic pole with a skimmer head, vacuum head, vacuum hose and
pool brush should become best friends with the pool surface over the
next few months. An entire test kit or new test strips are essential.

“Test the water with a good test kit every two to three days,” Pagonis
emphasized.
He and other pool service professionals are happy to take on the
daunting task of creating a safe and beautiful swimming environment.
A recent release from the Denville office of the Metro Chapter of the
Northeast Spa and Pool Association stated
“pool pumps, motors, filters, chlorinators, feeders, salt chlorine
generators, heaters, heat pumps, blowers, controls, and more are
critical for pool maintenance and are a lot to keep up with for someone
not professionally trained. For safety, a pool professional will review all
aspects of your pool to make sure it is operating safely and doesn’t
pose any safety risks. This includes a review of safety barriers (fencing
etc.), drain covers and in pool lighting.”
Meanwhile, crews from Champs Pool Service in Budd Lake are also
scrambling to ready people’s swimming holes. Everett Demouth, the
store manager, said he noticed that above ground pool covers have
been filling with water. “During the fall and spring people aren’t
keeping water off covers, and that can collapse the pool,” he noted.
Throughout the swimming season both stores follow up with clients,
testing pools and solving any problems that may arise. Demouth said
opening an above ground pool costs about $150, while an in ground
runs about $350 – $500. Broken equipment, pool cracks and other
issues increase the price.
Finally, safety is paramount to enjoying decks and pools to the fullest.
In addition to previously mentioned construction and pool chemistry,
safety precautions include appropriate child supervision around pools
and grills, correct gates, and having life-saving equipment close by.
Professional associations such as NESPA (www.nespapool.org) as well

as municipal officials can help homeowners who have questions about
safety and building code compliance.
With the right planning and execution, the pool and deck can be the go
to areas for the family and maybe even the neighborhood to
cannonball into summer fun.

]]>
0
new_view_media <![CDATA[Wreaths For Veterans]]> https://www.mypaperonline.com/?p=42804 2018-06-21T13:09:04Z 2018-06-21T13:09:04Z Essex County Executive Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr. (center) hosted a wreath laying ceremony in Essex County
Veterans Memorial Park to commemorate Memorial Day. With him are, from the left, Verona Mayor Kevin
Ryan, State Senator and Deputy Chief of Staff Teresa Ruiz, Newark DAV Commander Clarence Jackson,
Sheriff Armando Fontoura, Freeholders Lebby Jones and Len Luciano, Deputy Chief of Staff William Payne,
Chief of Staff Phil Alagia, South Orange Trustee and Freeholder Clerk Deborah Davis Ford, Newark
Councilman Anibal Ramos, and Caldwell VFW member and Essex County Health Officer Michael Festa.

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new_view_media <![CDATA[Church Plans Chicken Dinner]]> https://www.mypaperonline.com/?p=42791 2018-06-20T14:19:27Z 2018-06-20T14:19:27Z Panther Valley Ecumenical Church invites everyone to enjoy its next Chicken Dinner on Thursday, July 5, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., $5 per serving. This Chicken Dinner will feature Asian Chicken with fried rice and vegetable medley, dessert and beverages. All proceeds benefit the ministries of Panther Valley Ecumenical Church. The church is located at 1490 Route 517, Hackettstown. Questions,call 908-852-5444.

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new_view_media <![CDATA[Roxbury june 2018]]> https://www.mypaperonline.com/?p=42773 2018-06-18T17:02:13Z 2018-06-19T17:01:10Z

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new_view_media <![CDATA[Madison june 2018]]> https://www.mypaperonline.com/?p=42747 2018-06-14T16:37:49Z 2018-06-19T16:37:06Z

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new_view_media <![CDATA[Randolph june 2018]]> https://www.mypaperonline.com/?p=42742 2018-06-14T16:31:54Z 2018-06-19T16:30:48Z

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