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September 2022
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In This Issue

    Honoring Those Who Died on September 11

    Lager-Loving Locals and Ale Aficionados Near and Far Love Czig Meister Brewing Co

    Dining Out /Recipes

    A September Story by Richard Maybey

        Sister Cities: Summit NJ,Meet Summit, South Dakota

    

Road to Recovery Continues After Cancer Treatment Ends

    Mendham Artist Transports Us to Other Worlds

    Newspaper Reporter Writes Moving Book on OCD

    Non-Profit Plans to Launch NJ’s Inaugural ‘Thinkscape’ in Morris Township    

First Responder Day Promises Sports and Fun Activities

    Morristown Native Emily Kitchin Earns Multiple Lax Accolades at Franklin & Marshall

Morris Parks Skating Program Rates No. 1 in New Jersey

 

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Honoring Those Who Died on September 11

Steve Sears

My Life Publications remembers and honors those who died in the attacks of September 11, 2001. We reached out to each county in our publishing area for information about their dedicated 9/11 memorials.

Bergen County

147 county residents were among the almost 3,000 who died during the 9/11 attacks.A 9/11 World Trade Center Memorial is located in the Henry Hoebel Area of Overpeck Park next to Fort Lee Road in Leonia.

Essex County

On Sunday, October 20, 2002, the Essex County September 11th Eagle Rock Memorial was dedicated and unveiled. Added in 2009 was the Flight Crew Memorial, a tribute to the pilots and flight attendants on the four airplanes that crashed that day, and in 2011, a 7,400-pound steel and concrete artifact from the World Trade Center site and a bronze plaque recognizing the heroism of EMS personnel was added. In 2016, the Essex County Search and Rescue Dog Statue was then dedicated at the site to commemorate the role that dogs had in the search and recovery efforts at the World Trade Center and Pentagon after the attacks.

“After the attacks, people spontaneously came to Eagle Rock Reservation to view the tragedy unfold at the Twin Towers and leave cards, letters, photos and flowers in an impromptu memorial in honor of their loved ones,” says Essex County Executive, Joseph DiVincenzo, Jr. “I knew immediately that this was the natural location for a memorial because of the public attraction to this site and the unparalleled view of the World Trade Center from the lookout area. Our September 11th Memorial is a special place for people to come for solace and comfort because of its unique location and its powerful message of

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peace and hope.” The Essex County September 11th Eagle Rock Memorial is located in Essex County Eagle Rock Reservation off of Eagle Rock Avenue in West Orange. special place for people to come for solace and comfort because of its unique location and its powerful message of peace and hope.” The Essex County September 11th Eagle Rock Memorial is located in Essex County Eagle Rock Reservation off of Eagle Rock Avenue in West Orange. 

Morris County

Following the attacks in which 64 people from Morris County perished, a committee was formed which included the family members of people who died, to help locate a site for the memorial, raise funding for its construction, and select a sculptor to design it. The Morris County 9/11 Memorial was constructed on county-owned property in 2003 and dedicated on September 10 of that same year during a candlelight vigil. 

The memorial is located at 460 West Hanover Avenue, at Morris County 9/11 Memorial Park.

“Everyone in Morris County came together to site, fund and build our 9/11 memorial after that terrible day in 2001,” says Morris County Commissioner, Douglas Cabana. “Every bit of it symbolizes our grief for those lost, our resolve to continue living as a free nation and stand up to

oppression, and our hope that future Americans will find a bright future.To this day, more than 20 years after the attacks, the memorial remains an important part of life here. Every week, Morris County tends to that memorial. We have people cleaning the walkways and the pool, replacing the flowers and wiping down the plaques. It is visited almost daily by residents and visitors from outside our county. We will never forget.”

Passaic County

The 9/11 Memorial is located at the Public Safety Academy at 300 Oldham Road in Wayne.

Dedicated on September 10, 2013, it is comprised of a steel beam from the North Tower, and behind it is a rock with the dedication plaque with the names from the 30 Passaic County residents who died on 9/11. Bringing the beam down to the county

and its placement was organized by County Commissioner Bruce James and at the time, the Director of the Police Academy, Bob Lyons. The rock with the plaque was donated by Sam Braen, owner of Braen Stone.

Commissioner Director Bruce James says, “The events of September 11 changed our lives as individuals, and as a nation. In the 20 years since the attack, there is so much to reflect on – the lessons wehave learned and where we, as a nation, are headed. The tragic events that unfolded on 9/11 have molded us to find strength and hope in the face of crisis.”

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Somerset County

40 people from Somerset County died in the 9/11 attacks on our nation, and on September 11, 2004, the 9/11 Memorial was dedicated in Somerset County. It is located on the courthouse complex lawn in Somerville at the corner of Main and Bridge streets.  

County Surrogate Frank Bruno was able to obtain a piece steel from the World Trade Center, which is a permanent part of the memorial. The design, featuring a clock tower which reads, “Time to Remember,” was developed by county staff artist Linda Brady. The concept was converted into architectural drawings produced by The Musial Group of Mountainside. Construction was by Skinner & Cook of Roselle Park, and Michael Mills of Ford, Farewell, Mills & Gatsch in Princeton

provided advice on the design’s relationship to the historic nature of the courthouse green, which is on the state and national historic registers.

Union County

Dedicated on Sept. 13, 2003, the Union County September 11 Memorial is located on a hilltop at the border of Mountainside and Springfield in Union County’s Echo Lake Park.

Two girders recovered from the ruins of the World Trade Center are arranged within a five-sided area representing the Pentagon, and an Eternal Flame represents those who died in Pennsylvania along with members of the Armed Services and emergency responders. The names of the 60 deceased Union County residents are etched into the memorial.

Warren County

The Warren County Emergency Services and 9/11 Memorial site was dedicated in 2011, and the monument itself was completed for September 11, 2012 in memory of the four Warren County residents who died on September 11, 2001.

The memorial consists of a large steel girder from the Twin Towers, and two granite towers representing the North and South Towers of the World Trade Center. On either side are black granite memorials with the names of those from law enforcement, and the firefighters and EMS personnel who died in the line of duty. There are four smaller round pillars topped with brass disks, one memorializing Flight 93, one for the Pentagon, one for the World Trade Center, and the fourth for all of the locations that were attacked combined.

 The Memorial is located at 1500 State Highway 57 in Washington, on the driveway between the Warren County Technical School and the Warren County Community College, and near the county Public Safety Department and 911 Communications center.

According to Warren County Fire Marshal Joseph Lake, Jr., a memorial committee member, the memorial is a place of peace and rememberance. 

“It gives the residents of Warren County, particularly the ones who lost friends and loved ones, a place to go to and remember.” 

Non-Profit Plans to Launch NJ’s Inaugural ‘Thinkscape’ in Morris

By Jillian Risberg

Outdoor community gathering spaces mean everything to families. What better way to harness the Power of Play than with a new Thinkscape.

The first of its kind in New Jersey, Museum of Makers + Innovators (MOMI) are launching their playful learning pocket park soon at Morris Marketplace.

That’s at the corner of East Hanover Avenue and Martin Luther King Avenue, adjacent to the Hanover Township border.

According to founder Sara Sorenson, early on in the pandemic they were inspired by Dr. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek’s work at Temple University — to connect the science of learning with the benefits of play, and her team’s design of Philly’s Urban Thinkscape. 

“It means a great deal to us that we can bring such innovative work to New Jersey,” she says, of the multigenerational learning and connection-building transformative public space.

It took a village to bring this to fruition; a dedicated, mission driven group of individuals. 

MOMIs co-founders spent countless hours on this project, MOMI’s Board of Trustees and advisors have knowledge and experience that results in innovative and well thought out ideas and plans. 

They say none of this would be possible without the support and generosity of their families, donors and sponsors.

Sadly, play is declining in communities across the United States.

MOMI regularly hears from parents that they need a safe place where their children can get messy, experiment and explore. And while it will take time to build a world-class children’s museum where one can do all that, they hope to promote Thinkscape as something families need to make time for. 

Currently MOMI is a Museum Without Walls and conducts pop-up playful learning experiences at festivals and events. 

“Our hope through these playful learning opportunities is to shine a light on the benefits of play and bring back play to our communities,” says Sorenson. 

One of the best feelings of walking into a children’s museum is one of freedom. There are no rules, no expectations, according to Sorenson. 

She says they want to create that unrestricted awareness for visitors to MOMI once it is built.  They are free to use all of their senses to discover new things at their own pace. 

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And it is important that MOMI has both indoor and outdoor spaces to fuel the imagination.

Children spend 80% of their waking time OUTSIDE of school, and MOMI’s certified Playful Learning Landscapes (PLL) initiative at Morris Marketplace will serve the greater Morristown area with more hands-on children’s opportunities.

“PLLs create skill-building experiences in local community spaces as children are always learning, and research shows that (these types of) innovative initiatives in environments outside of school are as important as ones designed for the classroom,” says board trustee secretary Andreia Santos de Araujo. 

New Jersey has a world class science museum, amazing art and historical museums. These institutions are great assets to our state. But we do not have a state-of-the-art children’s museum built around the visitor — i.e. children and their families. 

Science museums are traditionally designed to teach specific scientific concepts. Art museums are built around collections and historical museums are designed to teach us about the history of place and time. 

MOMI will be designed to inspire a lifelong love of learning. The experiences at the intersection of art, science and nature will be open-ended for following one’s natural curiosity. Caregivers can get in on the fun and wake up their own curious nature. 

“In order for our children to be prepared with the skills to succeed in future careers, they need to develop 21st century skills,” says co-founder Nicole Pittaluga. “Children’s museums provide affordable, accessible opportunities for developing collaboration, critical thinking, growth mindset, communication, citizenship and creativity.”

Sorenson says they also want visitors to know they can be an advocate in their own community to create more child and family friendly infrastructure. 

MOMI wants families to engage with the park’s many playful learning zones, encouraging them to visit the park regularly. 

If you have driven on East Hanover Avenue in Morris Township, you will see that construction of Morris Marketplace is underway. Santos de Araujo says together with the property’s landscape designer and MOMI’s team of experts in early childhood development and design of children’s museum exhibits, they have created six playful learning zones to be installed in the park.

They anticipate the park will open late fall or early winter 2023, and are still working with the site developer. However, the successful completion of Morris Marketplace Thinkscape is dependent on the amount of community financial support they receive. 

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“We are hoping to raise $100,000 to cover the cost of the project,” treasurer Cathy Paugh says. “These gathering spaces are a much needed way to bring communities together. I would compare it to the feel of a downtown where you can meet and greet others and get to connect on a new level.” 

To learn more, visit www.thinkmomi.org. 

Mendham Artist Transports Us to Other Worlds

By Jillian Risberg 

For Leina’ala Schwartz, one doesn’t “become” an artist/painter, one just IS. And it is in her blood. 

“My art is everything to me and I love sharing it,” Schwartz says. “My neighbors tell me they always come to my front yard when they see I have pieces laying outside drying from the varnish. We’ve had some nice chats and caught up with each other’s lives and neighborhood news.”

According to the Mendham artist, she has a current work in progress from a tiny sepia photograph taken in the 1920s of her grandfather with his friends and family on a sailboat in Vieste, Italy on the tip of the Gargano. 

“I put my heart and soul into these paintings of things I see and places I love and I want to convey that feeling to anyone who views my art,” she says. “I want to say, ‘See how beautiful our world is, protect it.’”

Over the years Schwartz has tried her hand at various artistic modalities, and oil painting resonates the most with her, although the painter sometimes works in acrylics. 

In the past she has also done a series of collages depicting endangered marine species.

“One January evening we had a fabulous sunset that really moved me so I painted it. This is the view out my back door. There is a sheep farm on Main Street in Mendham that had a broken down barn that I decided to paint. Days after I took the photos the barn had been removed,” says the artist. 

She not only paints local scenes, Schwartz captures images of her travels.

And she can’t live without her three easels.  “One for the current painting, another for the one that’s drying but is still in the works, and the third for the one that’s ready to frame before going into an exhibit,” the artist says.  

Schwartz finds abundant inspiration everyday all around her. 

“My dreams and whatever sights I see,” the painter says. “When it ‘hits’ me I take a photo and paint it.”

Of the elements of art (line, shape, form, value, space, color, texture) the one that concerns Schwartz the most is value — which is what creates contrast and shows the source of the light. Another is perspective, linear and atmospheric. 

“An absolute must in all my paintings because these are the things that put the viewer into the painting,” says the artist. “I hear so often from viewers that they wish they could ‘go there.’”

When it comes to the work of others, Schwartz loves Kandinsky for his design and use of color, Warhol for teaching us that we can do just about

anything we darn well please, and Monet for his sheer beauty of the countryside. “Most importantly however, are my fellow artists, my peers who are enormously talented and whose art, in my opinion, is every bit as good as the masters,” she says. “I value their works, their input, their critiques and their praise, their camaraderie and their energy and all the hard work they do to promote our art.”

Schwartz had an innate gift for the arts from childhood; with a natural curiosity and appreciation for nature and beauty.

By age two she was entertaining family and friends by reciting, singing and by the age of four, playing the piano. At sixteen she wrote her own songs, taking first place in the talent competition at Morris County Fair, among others and had a recording contract with Ivy Records in New York. 

By high school graduation the painter was awarded a full tuition scholarship for drama from her chosen university and then participated in local theater. 

But that is not all. 

“There were the beauty pageants. I was second runner-up in the Miss Morristown Pageant (1960) and was Miss Morris County 1961,” the artist says from there she went to Wildwood to participate in the Miss New Jersey Pageant, a forerunner of Miss America.

“It was upon retirement that I returned to County College of Morris where I graduated Summa Cum Laude with a degree in Visual Arts, am a member of Phi Theta Kappa, and have been creating art ever since.”

It’s a lovely thing. 

“The serenity it gives me, losing myself in the reality of the painting, the feeling of being there, smelling the aromas of the sea or the woods or the neighborhood,” says Schwartz. “It is a welcome break from the business of life.”

For more information, reach out to the artist for purchases, questions or comments at www.leinaalasart.com. 

Local Songwriter Adds to the Morristown Area Music Scene

By Evan Wechman

New Jersey’s own Bobby Syvarth used to play almost every night at the small but intimate venues in Morristown. He dreamed of being a worldwide sensation like his idols James Taylor and Paul Simon. He would play all night into the wee hours of the morning, then after a few hours of sleep, drag himself into a full-time office job. He was in his early 20’s at this time.

Fast forward and Syvarth is now doing things a bit differently, but still contributing greatly to the Morristown music scene. Older and wiser, Syvarth is not trying to be the next James Taylor anymore. Instead, he works a full-time job as a paralegal in the music and media industry.

The locals will still find him playing events on weekends for causes close to him, but his focus has shifted. “I think as a songwriter putting out original music is one of my unique contributions. There’s a lot of cover or tribute bands and I play in bars where I do covers too. But I think my real contribution is original music that people seem to like,” he said.

Syvarth, who has been playing in the area for about two decades, is touring the most popular venues in Morristown and the entire county promoting his new original album, “Silver Lake Boulevard.”

This five-song album was written by Syvarth and combines many elements from his favorite music genres. “I’m coming out of that Grateful Dead, Fish, Dave Mathews, John Mayer kind of sound where you bring a little more jazz influence into the songs as well,” he said.

His tastes are varied and deep. Syvarth loves the acoustic rock sound of Paul Simon but is also extremely fond of jazz musician Bobby McFerrin. Even though Syvarth jokingly admits people laugh when they learn of his love for McFerrin due to his success of the song “Don’t Worry, Be Happy”, in the 1980’s, he remains firm that he would love to play alongside the jazz great one day.

“He is one of the greatest of all time, so he has been a huge inspiration for me,” Syvarth said. The local songwriter has even recorded covers of McFerrin’s songs on Spotify and believes jazz musicians are more well versed than musicians from other genres.

.Though the album is released under his own name, Syvarth, a largely self-taught musician, credits many other musicians for his success. After studying jazz at William Paterson University, he was taken under the wing of many professional musicians who gave their time and advice to him freely.

For example, he recently had a release party at Morristown’s The Homestead where he collaborated with many professional musicians who have played on albums of many well-known celebrities. Syvarth is especially proud of his relationship with Tom Carbone who produced “Silver Lake Boulevard.”

This is because Syvarth began recording this album right before COVID broke out, and even though there was a long period where they couldn’t play due to the lockdown, Carbone never gave up on him. According to Syvarth, for himself, Carbone, and every musician who gave a hand to this project, the recording of the album took “a lot of blood, sweat, and tears.”

Syvarth believes in staying loyal to the musicians who have helped him succeed and believes in giving back to the community as well. He has played at fundraisers for the benefit of the environment and has participated in raising funds for breast cancer awareness, most notably at Morristown’s Horseshoe Tavern.

Syvarth, although the songwriter for the album, is fully aware the music he creates is a collaborative effort. He stated that he is extremely appreciative of the knowledge he has been given by many others. He did want to express how bitter-sweet the production of his work has been.

He had the privilege of playing with Rick Chamberlain, the former principal trombonist for the New York City Ballet, who unfortunately lost his life to cancer a short time ago. “The album was the last thing he recorded and it’s meaningful to me as he was always very generous towards me. This project was the last time I had a chance to record with him,” he said.

For more information on Syvarth, visit www.bobbytime.com. 

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Lager-Loving Locals and Ale Aficionados Near and Far Love Czig Meister Brewing Co.

By Jillian Risberg 

Matthew Czigler has crafted his life with passion and purpose and he wouldn’t have it any other way.

His Czig Meister Brewing Co. is chock full of beautiful beers brewed to old-world classic perfection.  

And you get that vibe there too; since the brewery is housed in a 1900s-era Hackettstown historical carriage house. They repurposed much of the original building, including black-iron piping, red bricks and wood planks.

While remodeling, they noticed painted walls of the tasting room were salvaged from similar vintage bricks from the recently demolished Bergen Tool factory building across the street to build-out their tasting room bar.

Since opening — the Czigler family has embraced this community by becoming active members of the Hackettstown BID, Mt. Olive Chamber of Commerce and they tirelessly worked to keep the brewery running and all staff members (22) employed during the pandemic.

“This has led to many successful events including other local businesses and brought more people to town to continue a thriving Hackettstown and surrounding area,” says brewmaster Czigler. 

They sell core styles, three rotating series monthly and 15 seasonal styles, barrel aged beers and three natural flavor hard seltzers, plus special pilot batches only sold at the tap room.

And they pump out 3000 barrels (93,000 gallons) of beer on a 15 barrel brew system; that’s roughly 750,000 cans. 

Their brewing process is manual; Czig’s brewers turn every valve, move every grain bag and keg by hand.

With its 15-barrel brewhouse, the brewery produces 3,000 barrels, or 93,000 gallons of beer (roughly 750,000 cans). 

“We create and master many styles of beer. If you come in and say you don’t like beer, you have not tried the right one for you yet,” Czigler says most breweries specialize in four to six beers. “What makes us different is our large variety so people can experience all the beer has to offer.”

Soak it all in and uncover the beer that speaks to you.

The brewmaster’s hand-crafted beers never go unnoticed.

Czigler was awarded a Gold for Barrel Aged Imperial Stout at the Great American Beer Festival while working at Kane Brewing Company and Czig Meister cleaned up at this year’s New York International Beer Competition.

“We’re glad to see our hard work pay off, and many people enjoying the beers we love most,” says the brewmaster. “We also walked away with New Jersey’s Ale Brewery of the Year and New Jersey’s Hard Seltzer Brewery of the Year.”

“Over time you learn how the hops, grains, yeast and spices work together,” Czigler says.

When making a new beer the brewmaster and head brewer Dustin Sallitt combine their years of knowledge to find the next best recipe.

The past six years Czig has created more than 500, many done for special events like Stout Fest, Imperial Fest and CZeltzerfest.

Their first was Prospector Amber Ale 2016. 

Czigler says the brewery provides beer for many local festivals, including Donaldson Farms Food truck Festival, Lafayette Village Garlic Fest and the brewery’s yearly Anniversary party, 90’s Block Party and town-wide Hackettstown Oktoberfest (Sept 24-25).  

If he doesn’t have a Czig beer in hand, the brewmaster’s favorite drinks are dark rum and whiskey.

“And depending on the style of beer I pair with the many great local restaurants in Hackettstown,” he says. 

It all started when Czigler began to home brew as a hobby and family embraced his change from a potential career in medicine to open his own brewery — and the rest is history.

“Owning a business is different from what I would have thought, since you get your hands in all parts — sales, tap room, self-distribution and the community,” he says.

“The brewing part is exactly as I thought it would be.”

Quality Control tasting is a big part of Czigler’s role, starting at 8am.

And the brewmaster is a triple threat: with degrees in microbiology, biochemistry and molecular/cellular biology from the University of Maine. Czigler then earned a Master Brewer certificate from Siebel Institute and Doemens Academy in Munich, Germany.

He honed his brewing skills at Adirondack Pub and Brewery, then continued as head brewer at Kane. With a solid foundation in hand, he was ready to take Czig Meister on the brewery scene by storm. 

What’s next on tap for the Cziglers?

“Great beer, more awards,” says the brewmaster. “You may have seen our new look hit the shelves over the past few months — check out our rebranding everywhere you get your Czig Meister products.”

According to Czigler, about a quarter of the beer they brew is sold in their tap room — with liquor stores, restaurants and bars across the state selling the rest. 

“If you can’t find us locally, we home deliver to your door,” he says. “Place your order on czigmeisterbrewing.com.”

Want to know more, visit Instagram: www.instagram.com/czigmeister and Facebook: www.facebook.com/CzigMeister. 

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Morristown Teacher Wins Contract with Large National Publisher

By Evan Wechman

Lindsey Daly, a Morristown resident and social studies teacher at Unity Charter School has created a game book series for one of the world’s biggest publishing firms, Penguin Random House.  

In 2019, she created an Instagram page called Trauma Teacher where she posted funny memes and jokes for professionals in her field. It began as a hobby but her audience grew quickly as her videos and pictures increasingly became popular throughout the country.

When she received a mysterious message in March of 2020, she had surpassed 30,000 followers, and unbeknownst to her, had made people in the publishing world take notice.

According to Daly, “I literally got a direct message on Instagram from a girl who works in data marketing at Penguin Random House, and at first sight, I was wondering if it’s even a real thing. It just seemed like it was too good to be true. Someone wanted to refer me to one of the biggest publishers. So I looked her up on LinkedIn and researched her to make sure she was a real person and she was. From there, within like, 24 hours I was on the phone with the editors at Penguin. It was really a whirlwind of how it happened. It was like a day or two and then they were sending over a contract.»

The teacher now turned author said the large publishing house had “developed a bare bones outline and then I actually wrote the book.” She stated that the publishing house was very interested in finding someone who already had a big following. They had the idea and using their marketing methods found Daly to fulfill the book. Her Instagram page now has over 100,000 followers and is growing.

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Daly has completed the first two books of the “Would You Rather” series and has cumulatively sold over 250,000 books. The series will probably consist of about seven books with different holiday editions, but its unique format has taken off.

It is far from a traditional children’s book but it has captured the attention of her own students and those across the country due to its unique style. The books try to get kids and their families to talk about different random questions. For instance, one of Daly’s favorite “Would You Rather” questions is would you rather lose a championship game by two points or 20 points?  

As far as her writing process, she said “I don’t have a specific process. I just think of two things which could be comparable to one another and then put in some kind of twist.”

Daly also thinks the books are successful because it gets young people to interact and not just rely on technology. “I know a lot of teachers use the book to get their kids engaged or excited at school. It gets them all talking. They’re using their actual critical thinking skills.”

Daly is committed to finishing the book series but is unsure what’s in store for her next in the publishing world. She is thankful to Penguin Random House for the opportunity as they have also encouraged her to develop her own ideas. They are willing to get her any resources or contacts she may need to fulfill any future works. Though she doesn’t have an exact outline for a different book, she is grateful she has an open door with such a large firm. 

However, she wants students and others to know a few things. One, that there is an alternate path to entering the publishing world. “I thought you write query letters, you get a literary agent. They shop your book around, which does still happen. But I think this is also a new way to get into it.”

In addition, Daly would tell others to “put yourself out there enough. I think I’m proof good things will come out of it. I put myself out there in a different way. But it led to something else, because I wasn’t afraid to give it a try. I was dedicated and kept up with it. It wasn’t an overnight success. I just kept doing it consistently enough until it hit and I think a lot of kids are big on instant gratification. Be dedicated to something and put yourself out there.”

The books are available both online from Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

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Morristown Native Emily Kitchin Earns Multiple Lax Accolades at Franklin & Marshall

By Jerry Del Priore

Ex-Morristown-Beard lacrosse goalie Emily Kitchin, who played the same position at Division III Franklin & Marshall College, enjoyed a stellar career in net for the Diplomats all throughout her four-year career at the school.

For her efforts, in 2022, the Centennial Conference named Kitchin Defensive Player of the Year. Plus, Franklin & Marshall bestowed her with the Michael T.M. Karvasales ’35 Outstanding Female Senior Athlete award, and she earned USA Second-team lacrosse All-American honors. 

“I was a little surprised when I heard I got the award,” Kitchin recalled of learning of the Defensive Player of the Year honor. “It was absolutely insane. I never expected any award.” 

Additionally, Kitchin was a two-time first-team Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA) All-America (2021, 22) and a three-time first-team All-Metro Region player in 2019, 21 and 22.

Moreover, she equally excelled in the classroom, becoming a three-time Centennial Conference academic honor roll (2020, 21, 22) student. 

Accolades aside, Kitchin did not pick up the sport until the eighth grade. That is kind of late for any athlete who wishes to play the sport in college. But the Morristown native did not let it deter her one bit.

In fact, Kitchin said that she took to lacrosse pretty quickly, relying on her athleticism, hard work and passion for the sport to help make her successful in high school and ultimately earn a spot on Franklin & Marshall’s squad. 

The solid numbers speak for themselves. Kitchin’s 8.02 goals against average is sixth all-time, her 29 wins is fourth and the 381 saves in net is ninth in Diplomat Women’s lacrosse program history.

“I don’t regret it for one second,” said Kitchin, who also played hockey at Mo-Beard. “If starting to play in eighth grade led me to Franklin & Marshall, then I’m fine with it.”

With the Diplomats posting an 18-4 overall record in this past campaign, Kitchin said that making it to the NCAA Tournament Elite 8, a 14-9 defeat to Tufts, and beating second-ranked powerhouse Salisbury, 16-10, in March this past season among the highlights of her college lacrosse career. 

“I couldn’t have asked for a better way to end my career,” Kitchin said of the type of season she and the team had this year. “I never had that dream of playing D1. I wanted a combination of great lacrosse and great academics. I got that. My experience was phenomenal. I got what I wanted out of it. It (the college) was the right fit for me.”

A Business, Organizations & Society major, Kitchin will now transition into a job with Deloitte in government and public service (GPS), in Washington, D.C., in the fall.

Drawing from her memorable times at the school and on the college’s lacrosse squad, Kitchin said she will possibly look into coaching club lacrosse once she gets settled into her new surroundings. 

“It (Franklin & Marshall Women’s Lacrosse) definitely was a great community, and I didn’t want to leave it,” she said. “But it definitely worked out, and I wanted to end my career with the girls I started with. Now, I can move right into my new life easier because of what I learned at Franklin & Marshall.”

Dining & Recipes

A ‘Meatless Monday’ Family Meal

Enjoying a meal with loved ones at the end of the day is a timeless tradition, but many families feel as though they’re constantly searching for ways to mix up the menu. 

One trend gaining traction among home chefs is “meatless Mondays” in which classic dishes are made using substitutions for meat like veggies or grains. It’s a simple way to maintain nutritional value at the dinner table while putting a tasty twist on worn-out meals. 

This Meatless Cheesy Burrito Bake can provide your family a flavorful way to skip the meat and make way for protein in the form of brown rice paired with bell peppers, onion and refried beans wrapped in wheat tortillas and topped with cheese, salsa and guacamole. 

Find more creative family dinner inspiration at Culinary.net.

Enjoying a meal with loved ones at the end of the day is a timeless tradition, but many families feel as though they’re constantly searching for ways to mix up the menu. 

One trend gaining traction among home chefs is “meatless Mondays” in which classic dishes are made using substitutions

Enjoying a meal with loved ones at the end of the day is a timeless tradition, but many families feel as though they’re constantly searching for ways to mix up the menu. 

One trend gaining traction among home chefs is “meatless Mondays” in which classic dishes are made using substitutions for meat like veggies or grains. It’s a simple way to maintain nutritional value at the dinner table while putting a tasty twist on worn-out meals. 

This Meatless Cheesy Burrito Bake can provide your family a flavorful way to skip the meat and make way for protein in the form of brown rice paired with bell peppers, onion and refried beans wrapped in wheat tortillas and topped with cheese, salsa and guacamole. 

Find more creative family dinner inspiration at Culinary.net.

Enjoying a meal with loved ones at the end of the day is a timeless tradition, but many families feel as though they’re constantly searching for ways to mix up the menu. 

One trend gaining traction among home chefs is “meatless Mondays” in which classic dishes are made using substitutions

Quick, Nutritious Dishes to Enjoy Dairy Without the Discomfort

Quick, Nutritious Dishes to Enjoy Dairy Without the Discomfort

Dinnertime dishes loaded with nutrients help keep loved ones connected while refueling after busy days spent at work and school. Dairy foods – key ingredients in many at-home meals – provide nutrients for people of all ages to grow and maintain stronger bodies and minds. 

However, some bodies are unable to break down the sugar found in milk, known as lactose, which causes an upset stomach and a heavy, bloated feeling. Rather than avoiding dairy and missing out on beneficial nutrients, people with lactose intolerance can enjoy real dairy products that are naturally low in or don’t contain lactose without the stomachache with foods like:

Chicken Cordon Bleu Kebabs

Recipe courtesy of Rachel Gurk of “Rachel Cooks” on behalf of Milk Means More

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cook time: 10 minutes

Servings: 3

Skewers:

Nonstick cooking spray

2 chicken breasts (6 ounces each), cubed

1 ham steak (6 ounces), cubed

6 bamboo skewers (8 inches)

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon pure maple syrup

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

1/4 teaspoon paprika

1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil

Sauce:

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons flour

1 cup lactose-free 2% milk

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 cup shredded Swiss cheese

salt, to taste (optional)

pepper, to taste (optional)

To make skewers: Preheat broiler to 500 F. Line broiler pan with foil and spray with nonstick cooking spray. 

Thread cubed chicken pieces and cubed ham pieces onto skewers.

In small bowl, combine Dijon mustard, maple syrup, black pepper, paprika and oil.

Brush mustard mixture on skewers.

Broil about 5 minutes, flip and cook 5 minutes, or until chicken is cooked through.

To make sauce: In small saucepan over medium heat, melt butter. Whisk in flour and cook 1 minute, whisking constantly. Gradually add milk, whisking constantly. Add Dijon mustard. Continue cooking 5 minutes, or until thick. Reduce heat to low and stir in cheese, whisking until melted.

Add salt and pepper, to taste, if desired.

Serve chicken and ham kebabs with sauce.

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Morris Parks Skating Program Rates No. 1 in New Jersey

The Morris County Park Commission’s skating program at the Mennen Sports Arena is being honored by the national Learn to Skate USA organization, which has ranked it No. 1 in New Jersey.

Learn to Skate announced the ranking in an Aug. 4, 2022 letter noting the Morris County skating program enrolled 1,242 skaters this year into the affiliated Mennen Learn to Skateprogram. The achievement will land the Mennen Arena program a highlight in the Winter Issue of the Learn to Skate USA Magazine and the October Issue of SKATING Magazine, where the Morris County program will be shared with all members of U.S. Figure Skating.

“To be acknowledged by Learn to Skate USA for the Arena’s Learn to Skate Program is a testament to the dedicated professional skate instructors, arena staff and the participants who will benefit from learning a skill that will allow for low impact physical activity for a lifetime,” said David Helmer, Executive Director of the Morris County Park Commission.

Learn to Skate USA is a world-recognized educational program that promotes skating nationally. It is supported by U.S. Figure Skating, USA Hockey and U.S. Speedskating, as well as the Special Olympics, the Professional Skaters Association and the U.S. Ice Rink Association.

Learn to Skate USA offers a standardized curriculum designed to help skaters of all ages and abilities master the basics of ice skating through specially formulated pathways for preschoolers, older children, adults and skaters with disabilities.

The William G. Mennen Sports Arena was built in 1973 on donated land in Morris Township and it was opened to the public on January 12, 1975 with only one ice surface and permanent seating for 2,500 spectators. In 1986, a second ice surface was completed and in 2002, a third ice surface was completed.

Mennen Sports Arena now receives over 1 million visitors annually, and has hosted everyone from National Hockey League players and Olympic champion skaters to world class tennis players and pop-music stars at the many events held in nearly 50 years of operations.

Learn more about the Mennen Arena at MorrisParks.Net.

The Road to Recovery Continues After Cancer Treatment Ends

The American Cancer Society reports that the five-year survival rate for all cancers combined that were diagnosed between 2009 and 2015 was 67 percent. That’s a noteworthy and encouraging statistic, though global figures compiled by Ourworldindata.org indicate that five-year survival rates following diagnosis are significantly lower in poorer countries. In addition, the road to recovery for cancer patients typically does not end when treatments are completed. 

The National Cancer Institute notes that many cancer survivors have indicated that information and support was abundant during their treatment. However, once treatment stopped, a new wave of questions and uncertainty soon emerged. For example, the NCI points out that many cancer survivors recognize that life after treatment is less about “getting back to normal” than it is about discovering the new normal. In fact, the Memorial Sloan Ketting Cancer Center reports that most people indicate it takes between six and 12 months after they complete chemotherapy before they truly feel like themselves again. 

Follow-up care also is a vital part of recovering from cancer. The NCI notes that cancer survivors typically return to the doctor every three to four months during the first two to three years after treatment. After that, survivors may see their doctors once or twice a year. Follow-up care is vital for cancer survivors, as it provides their doctors an opportunity to determine if patients are experiencing any side effects from treatment. These appointments also allow doctors to determine if the cancer has returned or spread to other parts of the body. In addition, follow-up visits provide an opportunity for cancer survivors to bring up any symptoms or questions they might have. Patients can ask about ways to reduce their risk of cancer recurrence and seek advice on getting back to normal, including how quickly they can begin exercising and how to approach new fitness regimens if they were inactive prior to diagnosis.

The road to recovery from cancer may be filled with uncertainty. But cancer survivors should recognize that millions before them have survived the disease and gone on to live full, happy lives. A patient approach to recovery can help cancer survivors overcome any obstacles they may encounter along the way.  T

he American Cancer Society reports that the five-year survival rate for all cancers combined that were diagnosed between 2009 and 2015 was 67 percent. That’s a noteworthy and encouraging statistic, though global figures compiled by Ourworldindata.org indicate that five-year survival rates following diagnosis are significantly lower in poorer countries. In addition, the road to recovery for cancer patients typically does not end when treatments are completed. 

The National Cancer Institute notes that many cancer survivors have indicated that information and support was abundant during their treatment. However, once treatment stopped, a new wave of questions and uncertainty soon emerged. For example, the NCI points out that many cancer survivors recognize that life after treatment is less about “getting back to normal” than it is about discovering the new normal. In fact, the Memorial Sloan Ketting Cancer Center reports that most people indicate it takes between six and 12 months after they complete chemotherapy before they truly feel like themselves again. 

Follow-up care also is a vital part of recovering from cancer. The NCI notes that cancer survivors typically return to the doctor every three to four months during the first two to three years after treatment. After that, survivors may see their doctors once or twice a year. Follow-up care is vital for cancer survivors, as it provides their doctors an opportunity to determine if patients are experiencing any side effects from treatment. These appointments also allow doctors to determine if the cancer has returned or spread to other parts of the body. In addition, follow-up visits provide an opportunity for cancer survivors to bring up any symptoms or questions they might have. Patients can ask about ways to reduce their risk of cancer recurrence and seek advice on getting back to normal, including how quickly they can begin exercising and how to approach new fitness regimens if they were inactive prior to diagnosis.

The road to recovery from cancer may be filled with uncertainty. But cancer survivors should recognize that millions before them have survived the disease and gone on to live full, happy lives. A patient approach to recovery can help cancer survivors overcome any obstacles they may encounter along the way. 

Sister Cities: Summit, New Jersey Meet Summit, South Dakota

By Steve Sears

If you visit Summit, South Dakota, there is a good chance you are going to run into Dawn Wright, whose official title is Community Coordinator. 

“I married into the community,” Wright says, who has lived in the town for 28 years. “I wasn’t born here; I wasn’t raised here. I fell in love here and my husband dragged me kicking and screaming up the hill,” she says with a laugh. “We have one church, we have one school, and we’re proud to say we still have our school (Summit School), and the enrollment has actually been going up because we have an open enrollment.” Wright works as the school librarian, works in special care education, twice a week helps with the after-school programs, and is secretary of the local Hope Lutheran Church. “That’s another thing with small towns – where you work you usually wear multiple hats.”

The Roberts County Summit, South Dakota, which is about 30 miles away from any large city or town, is less than one square mile in size, and is home to less than 300 people. Its Sister City, Morris County’s Summit, New Jersey has about 22,000 residents and is about six square miles. Route 27 bisects the western Summit north to south. Established in 1892, it is located in the northeastern part of South Dakota. “We’re right by the railroad track, so that was the main reason that the town was founded,” Wrights says of Summit, which is also at the tail end of the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation. 

Wright adds, “Around here, if you mention ‘Summit,’ most people say, ‘Oh, that’s the place that has bad weather.’ And that’s mainly because of our location, which is why we’re called ‘Summit.’ We’re one of the highest points anywhere.” Because of that, Summit, South Dakota has its own weather pattern. As you climb the hill to Summit, the snow character changes until it reaches its peak in Summit, where blizzards often abound. “We also used to have what we would call our ‘Fog Fest’, ceremony. That’s another thing that we’re really known for, our fog. There’s fog, and then there’s Summit fog. It’s a whole other level. I live a block from our church, and there’s been days when the fog was so bad that I could hardly even see the church.”

Summit, South Dakota is sometimes referred to as a “bedroom community.” Those who enjoy the small-town type living will reside here, and then commute outside of the community and at a distance for work. Also, Summit is a haven for retirees. Wright says, “One couple who lives a block and a half away came from Minneapolis. They no longer wanted the craziness of the city, and came to our nice, quiet community. They chose us. People move here for different reasons.”

Whether you choose to live in Summit or just stop for a short period, you can take a leisurely drive around and visit the 174-acre Summit Lake, and if staying in the community, you’ll be looking at booking space at County Line Campground on Maple Street. If not a camper, you’ll find other accommodations 15 miles or so away from the town in other locations. As for dining, Summit, South

Dakota is a meat and potatoes town (“It’s cattle country around here,” Wright says), and you’ll find that at the aptly named (and capitalized for good reason) FOGGY’S Bar & Grill on Sherman Avenue. The new TA Express Travel Center on nearby Route 12 offers a Pizza Hut Express and a Subway, but for a true sit-down meal, FOGGY’S is it, with bar food like hamburgers, French fries, chicken sandwiches, and the very popular chili cheese hot dog.

At the before-mentioned TA Express Travel Center, in addition to whatever eats you may find, there is also a Caribou Coffee and Cinnabon, and you can take your java and snack to the adjacent Coffee Cup Bark Park, where your four-legged family members can rest as well.

“It’s such a simple community,” Wright says. “We’re not fancy by any means, it’s just very simple living. I know my neighbors, and we’ve known each other for years. We’re kind of like a big family. I’ve been at the school long enough that I’ve started to teach some of my student’s kids. I can’t imagine living anywhere else. I absolutely love it here.”

For more information about Summit, South Dakota, visit www.seesummitsd.com.

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Newspaper Reporter Writes Moving Book on OCD

By Evan Wechman

Ever since I was a child, I wanted to be a writer. I’ve been writing for different publications in New Jersey, including this one for several years. However, my dream has always been to complete a book that adds something of value to the community.

Unfortunately, since I was a child, I’ve suffered immensely from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) which has taken its toll on both me and my family. There were a lot of things I wanted to accomplish in my life that got sidetracked due to this illness which is all too prevalent.

For me, the turning point came when as a young adult, my father confided in me that he had OCD and was still able to make a good life for himself. He also told me he would always love me and believed I could get better.

That changed everything and, in my book, “Family Illness,” this beautiful story is told. My father passed away from Covid in 2020 and I never got the chance to present him with a copy. This book was intended to be my way of letting my Dad know he was my hero, and that I never would have survived without his love.

My father who taught at several universities throughout New Jersey including Ramapo College and Saint Peters University grew up in a time when mental health was not discussed and was forced to live in silence for a great period of time. I believe our society has made significant progress, but we still have great strides to make.

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 The love a family can provide to someone suffering from OCD or any mental illness can help immensely. This book is aimed primarily at those who are in pain, their families, and professionals serving this population as well. I am trying to tell a good story but at the same time, provide comfort as well. I have been touched by the outpouring of support from therapists who specialize in OCD treatment. One such local psychotherapist said “Evan’s writing style makes his book enjoyable and eye opening for people struggling with OCD, their family members and clinicians in mental health. Evan’s story can resonate with thousands of people suffering from OCD.”In the past, I have worked with a variety of families throughout New Jersey, forming and working with them in support groups. There is no magic pill, and this book is not going to solve all problems associated with the illness. However, I sincerely hope it lends a compassionate and compelling voice to the mental health community.

At this point, I have started under the tutelage of Livingston Author and Entrepreneur Barry Farber to place my books in non-traditional settings. For example, I am in the process of seeking partnerships with cafes and restaurants to place my book by the register rather than having it get lost in a bookstore surrounded by thousands of other books. At these locations, I will be providing signed copies of the book along with brochures and other information about mental health.

To give back more to the community, a portion of these sales will go towards mental health groups fighting stigma.

If anyone would like to purchase an autographed copy, I can be emailed at evanmwechman@gmail.com. My books can also be found online at www.amazon.com/Family-Illness-Evan-Wechman/dp/1647503485.

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A September Story

By Richard Mabey Jr.

In June of 1973, at the age of 19, I graduated with an Associate of Arts degree from County College of Morris. It was a tough two years for me. But, it was also a very fulfilling time. I had been stretched like a rubber band. And, I came through it all a wiser and stronger individual.

During my time at CCM, I went to a local chiropractor to get my spine adjusted on a regular basis. My chiropractor encouraged me to go to chiropractic school, so I applied to Sherman College of Chiropractic in Spartanburg, South Carolina. I was accepted and made plans to begin chiropractic college in September. 

That summer, I worked full time at the A&P. I saved every penny that I could. And, as the dawn of September became closer, I prepared myself to depart from the old Mabey Homestead. To live away from loved ones and good friends. It was an emotional time, filled with a bit of sadness and yet also a time of hope for new adventures waiting to unfold.

I confess that I did not find chiropractic school easy. Specifically, I had a tough time with chemistry. In chiropractic college, a student is required to take one semester of inorganic chemistry, two semesters of organic chemistry, and two semesters of biochemistry. I did get some grades of B’s on my tests, but I mostly got C’s on many of my tests. However, a few times, I actually did ace some of my chemistry exams. 

I worked at a grocery store, during my years at

All through my time at County College of Morris, I worked 29 hours a week at the A&P grocery store in Whippany. There were times when I worked the night shift, from 11:00 at night till 7:00 in the morning. I would punch out from work, climb up the stairs to the rest room, wash my face, wash up a bit and change my shirt. Then, I would buy a cinnamon bun at the A&P and drive off to CCM for an 8:00 class. I remember my class would end at 9:30. I didn’t have another class till 11:00, so I would go to the library, find an isolated corner, and put my face on my forearms on the desk and fall asleep. I kept a little travel alarm clock in my attaché case, that I also carried my books in. 

I took my studies very seriously and managed to make the Dean’s List, for all four semesters at CCM. I also wrote weekly columns and articles for Youngtown Edition, the official college newspaper of CCM. It was a tough time. But I enjoyed every minute of it

Sherman College. Like my days at CCM, I found it all so tough, but also very rewarding.

I did practice chiropractic for a few years, in a small town in West Virginia. But I was not very successful at it. I will write more about that, in a future article for this newspaper. Fate and destiny called me home to become a writer. It is strange how the angels will set a path for your life.

If you’re facing a tough challenge, please do not give up. There were times, when I was in college, when I thought I wasn’t going to make it. Both at County College of Morris and at Sherman College of Chiropractic. But I did my absolute best to stay tough and be positive. Please, if you are going through a tough time to accomplish a goal that is important to you, do not give up! Never, ever give up! 

Richard Mabey Jr. is a freelance writer. He can be reached at richardmabeyjr@hotmail.com. Please put on the subject line: September Story. 

 

 

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